Sides: Braised Onion Tart Tatin (Parade of Pies, Part 8)

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Onion Tart Tatin

We’re finally done with the dessert pies! As good as those all were, savory pies are one of my latest obsessions. Making a savory pie can be just as easy as making a sweet pie, but for some reason we don’t always think of them. We should, however, because savory pies are a great way to feed and impress a lot of people at once. Think about it: you pick a filling, execute, and then all of the sudden you have a gorgeous meal that can feed eight people, give or take. This pie is a perfect example of one of those impressive, but actually pretty easy pies. And for all its looks, it was a pretty inexpensive pie to make as well, since the filling was mostly made up of onions.

Serve this as a side to any meal. This is great for potlucks, since it is not likely to be duplicated by other guests. Those who prefer not to eat meat, dairy, or eggs will be relieved to have a complex dish on the table that is not just another pasta salad. 

Recipe: Braise Onion Tart Tatin

Adapted from Pies, Pies & More Pies! by Viola Goren

  • 1 pastry dough
  • 3 large white onions, peeled and quartered
  • 3 large sweet Vidalia onions, peeled and quartered
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar (or 1/4 cup white sugar + ½ tbsp molasses)
  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • salt and pepper
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees, line a baking sheet with aluminum foil, and prepare filling. In a medium bowl, gently toss onions with oil, brown sugar, vinegar, salt and pepper. Arrange onions in a single layer on baking sheet and roast for 20-30 minutes, or until golden. Set aside to cool.
  2. Grease a large sauce pan and arrange onion quarters in a spiral that starts at the outside and finishes in the center.
  3. On a lightly floured surface, roll out chilled dough to about ¼” thick. Lay on top of the onions, tucking it inside the pan all around the edges. Pierce several steam vents with a fork/knife. Bake until top is golden, 30-40 minutes.
  4. Allow to cool, and then invert the pie onto a large serving plate to serve.

About this author:  I'm a New Yorker who would rather cook than go out to restaurants. Sometimes I think I may be in the wrong city for that. Then I remember the exotic ingredients I'd be hard-pressed to find if I lived somewhere else. My cooking style is an eclectic range of everyday-American, Italian, middle-eastern, with extensive forays into Japanese cuisine, and some pit-stops into Indian and African cuisines. I love to try my hand at recreating dishes I taste. While I enjoy most anything with a flavor, from high cuisine to instant junk food, I have a soft spot in my belly for home-style cooking no matter the geographic or ethnic origin. Read more from this author...


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